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Content: Politics of Europe: Syllabus

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Note: While there are no formal prerequisites for this course, the instructor strongly recommends students having some prior knowledge of comparative political systems. The course Comparative Politics offers an excellent introduction to the subfield and should be considered before enrolling in this course. As this is an upper-level course, Sophomores and especially Freshmen are advised to enroll at a later date.


Grading Weights

Students’ overall evaluation will be determined by the following criteria:

Work Result Weight Due
Two 10-15 page papers 50% (25% each) session 7 and  session 15
Take-home Final exam 30% session 16
Take-home Final exam plus two essays
20% (20 points accumulated throughout the semester) all sessions
Due Dates

All class assignments must be submitted in hard copy and uploaded to the university online plattform. Late papers will result in a deduction of 1/3 of a grade each day they are late. This includes weekends. You may upload your late paper to halt any additional penalties, but it must be followed up with a hard copy. There are no extensions as assignments are provided well in advance. The final exam should also be uploaded, and a hard copy dropped off in the Political Science mailroom.

Papers

(text)

Final Exam

(text)

Essays

Additionally, students must submit at least two 3 – 5 page short essays at the end of each section addressing any of the accompanying study questions that will be posted online. These papers carry a maximum of 5 points out of the total 20 that can be earned by the end of the semester. You are certainly welcome to submit all four short papers if you like.

Participation

Class participation is accumulated throughout the semester through active engagement. This includes speaking in class discussion, successfully answering unannounced quizzes, and coming to office hours (if necessary). Each time a student “participates”, a point will be awarded, with a maximum of 20 to be earned by the end of the semester.

Maintaining a consistent participation score is not only the easiest component of your grade to achieve, but it also ensures you are up to date with your readings and provides a good opportunity for writing strong research papers. It should be noted that it is highly unlikely a student will earn all 20 points without the short papers. Attendance is not related to participation. You can have a perfect attendance record but if you remain silent, you are not “participating”.


Provided Work Material

There are no books for you to purchase. All readings are available for .pdf download on our course website.

However, because we will be using one book extensively in the second half of class, you may wish to purchase:

Schedule
Session Content
Part I: Introduction

Week 1

European (n) Politics, and European (adj) Politics

  • Read the syllabus, familiarize yourself with the website, and begin your readings
Weeks 1 - 2

Developmental Paths of European States

  • Barrington Moore: Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy (Boston: Beacon Press, 1966), ch 7: “The Democratic Route to Modern Society”, pp. 413 – 32
  • Moore: Social Origins, ch 8: “Revolution from Above and Fascism”, pp. 433 – 452
Suggested Readings
  • Robert Dahl: Polyarchy: Participation and Opposition (Yale University Press, 1971), pp. 1-16, and 33-47
  • Charles Tilly: Coercion, Capital, and European States, AD 990 – 1992 (Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 1992), ch. 6: “The European State System”, pp. 161 – 191
Part II: 1848 – 1875
Week 3

Setting the Stage for a Modern European System

  • Eric Hobsbawm: The Age of Capital: 1848 – 1875 (New York: Vintage Books, 1996), ch. 1: “’The Springtime of Peoples’”, pp. 9 – 26

Suggested Readings

  • Michael Rapport: 1848: Year of Revolution (New York: Basic Books, 2009), ch. 3: “The Springtime of Peoples”, pp. 112 – 186
  • Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels: “The German Ideology”, in The Marx-Engels Reader, Robert C. Tucker, ed., (New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 1978), pp. 146 – 200
  • Moore: Social Origins: ch. 9: “The Peasants and Revolution”, pp. 453 – 483
  • Benedict Anderson: Imagined Communities (New York: Verso Press, 1983), ch. 5: “Old Languages, New Models”, pp. 67 – 82
  • Ernest Gellner: Nations and Nationalism (Cornell University Press, 1983), ch. 5: “What is a Nation?”, pp. 53 – 62
Part III: 1875 - 1914
Weeks 4 - 5

Nationalizing States and Homeland Nationalism

  • Hobsbawm: The Age of Capital, ch. 5: “Building Nations”, pp. 82 – 97
  • Hobsbawm: The Age of Capital, ch. 6: “The Forces of Democracy”, pp. 98 – 115
  • Michael Rapport: Nineteenth-Century Europe (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005), ch. 10: “Unifications and State Building”, pp. 174 – 199
  • Paul N. Hehn: “The Origins of Modern Pan-Serbism – The 1844 Na?ertanije of Ilija Garašanin: An Analysis and Translation”, East European Quarterly, vol. 9, no. 2 (1975), pp. 153 – 171

Suggested Readings

  • Eugen Weber: Peasants into Frenchmen: The Modernization of Rural France 1870 – 1914 (Stanford University Press, 1976)
  • Erich Eyck: Bismarck and the German Empire (New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 1958), ch. 3: “The North German Confederation and the French War”, pp. 139 – 187
  • Katherine Verdery: National Ideology under Socialism: Identity and Cultural Politics in Ceau?escu’s Romania (University of California Press, 1991), ch. 1: “Antecedents: National Ideology and Cultural Politics in Presocialist Romania”, pp. 27 – 71
Week 6

Self-Determination Amid Imperial Twilight

  • Eric Hobsbawm: The Age of Empire: 1875 – 1914 (New York: Vintage Books, 1989), ch. 4: “The Politics of Democracy”, pp. 84 – 111
  • Hobsbawm: The Age of Empire, ch. 13: “From Peace to War”, pp. 302 – 27

Suggested Readings

  • Max Weber: The Protestant Work Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (New York: Macmillan, 1958), ch 2: “The Spirit of Capitalism”, pp. 47 – 78
  • Rogers Brubaker: Nationalism Reframed: Nationhood and the National Question in the New Europe (Cambridge University Press, 1996), ch. 3: “National Minorities, Nationalizing States, and External National Homelands in the New Europe”, pp. 55 – 76
First Short Essay Collected
Part IV: 1914 - 1945
Weeks 7 - 9

Fascism as Disgruntled Democracy

  • Richard Evans: The Coming of the Third Reich (New York: Penguin Books, 2003), ch 2: “The Failure of Democracy”, pp. 78 – 153
  • Adolf Hitler: Mein Kampf (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1971), Volume II, ch. 1: “Philosophy and Party”, pp. 373 – 385
  • Robert Paxton: The Anatomy of Fascism (New York: Vintage Books, 2004), ch. 3: “Taking Root”, pp. 55 – 86
  • Joachim C. Fest: Hitler (New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1974), “Interpolation II: German Catastrophe or German Consistency?” pp. 387 – 399

Suggested Readings

  • Hannah Arendt: The Origins of Totalitarianism (San Diego: Harcourt, Inc., 1968), ch. 8: “Continental Imperialism: the Pan-Movements”. pp. 222 – 266
  • Arendt: The Origins of Totalitarianism, ch 10: “A Classless Society”, pp. 305 – 340
  • Shari Berman, “Civil Society and the Collapse of the Weimar Republic”, World Politics, vol. 49 (April 1997), pp. 401 – 29
  • Ian Kershaw, The ‘Hitler Myth’: Image and Reality in the Third Reich (Oxford University Press, 1987), ch, 1:”’Führer of the Coming Germany’ The Hitler Image in the Weimar Era”, pp. 13 – 47
Second Short Essay Collected
Part V: 1945 - 1968
Week 10

Towards a (Re)Unification of Europe

  • Tony Judt, Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945 (New York: Penguin Books, 2006), ch. 3: “The Rehabilitation of Europe”, pp. 63 – 99
  • Judt, Postwar, ch. 5: “The Coming of the Cold War”, pp. 153 – 164

Suggested Readings

  • Konrad H. Jarausch, After Hitler: Recivilizing Germans, 1945 – 1995 (Oxford University Press, 2006), Part I: “Forced Reorientation”, pp. 19 – 98
  • Judt, “The End of Old Europe”, pp. 226 – 237

*** First Research Paper Due***

Week 11

Modern European Political Parties

  • Stathis N. Kalyvas, The Rise of Christian Democracy in Europe (Cornell University Press, 1996), Introduction: “The Christian Democratic Phenomenon”, pp. 1 – 20
  • Kalyvas, The Rise of Christian Democracy in Europe, Conclusion: “Toward a Theory of Christian Democracy”, pp. 257 – 264
  • Judt, Postwar, ch. 11: “The Social Democratic Movement”, pp. 360 – 389
Part VI: 1968 - Present
Week 12

1848: The Sequel

  • Judt, Postwar, ch. 12: “The Spectre of Revolution”, pp. 390 – 421
  • Eric Hobsbawm, The Age of Extremes: A History of the World, 1914 – 1991 (New York: Vintage Books, 1994), ch. 11: “Cultural Revolution”, pp. 334 – 343

Suggested Readings

Weeks 13 - 14

The European Community as Economic and Political Union

  • Judt, Postwar, ch. 16: “A Time of Transition”, pp. 526 – 534
  • Judt, Postwar, ch. 17: “The New Realism”, pp. 535 – 558

Suggested Readings

  • Laura Desfor Edles, Symbol and Ritual in the New Spain (Cambridge University Press, 1998), ch 4: “The Spirit of Consensus: The Core Representations of the Spanish Transition”, pp. 41 – 62
  • Jonathan Steinberg, Why Switzerland? (Cambridge University Press, 1980), ch. 3: “Politics”, pp. 53 – 97
  • Ezra Suleiman, “Is Democratic Supranationalism a Danger?” in Nationalism and Nationalities in the New Europe, Charles A. Kupchan, ed., (Cornell University Press, 1995), pp. 66 – 84
  • Andrew Moravcsik, The Choice for Europe (Cornell University Press, 1998), ch. 7: “European Integration in Retrospect”, pp. 472 – 501
Third Short Essay Collected

Week 15

End of the Communist Power Monopoly

  • Vaclav Havel, Living in Truth (London: Faber & Faber, 1987), “Letter to Dr. Gustáv Husák”, pp. 3 – 35

Suggested Reading

  • Jan Kubik, “The Polish Round Table of 1989: The Cultural Dimension(s) of the Negotiated Regime Change,” in Negotiating Radical Change. Understanding and Extending the Lessons of the Polish Round Table Talks, Michael D. Kennedy and Brian Porter, eds. (University of Michigan Press, 2000), pp. 87 - 109 http://www.umich.edu/~iinet/PolishRoundTable/negotiatingradicalchange/dimensions.html
  • Stephen Kotkin and Jan T. Gross, Uncivil Society: 1989 and the Implosion of the Communist Establishment (New York: Modern Library Books, 2009
  • Vladimir Tismaneanu, Fantasies of Salvation: Democracy, Nationalism, and Myth in Post-Communism (Princeton University Press, 1998).
  • V.P. Gagnon, The Myth of Ethnic War: Serbia and Croatia in the 1990s (Cornell University Press, 2004)
  • Wallace L. Daniel, The Orthodox Church and Civil Society in Russia (Texas A&M University Press, 2006)

Fourth Short Essay Collected

Weeks 16

“European” as Adjective

  • Judt, Postwar, ch. 22: “The Old Europe – and the New”, pp. 713 – 748 (EU)
  • Judt, Postwar, ch. 24: “Europe as a Way of Life”, pp. 777 – 800

Suggested Readings

  • Nicolai Petro, Crafting Democracy: How Novgorod has Coped with Rapid Social Change (Cornell University Press, 2004), ch. 4: “Three Keys to Understanding Rapid Social Change”, pp. 95 – 125
  • Rogers Brubaker, Nationalist Politics and Everyday Ethnicity in a Transylvanian Town (Princeton University Press, 2006), ch. 4: “Cluj after Ceau?escu”, pp. 119 – 163
  • Rogers Brubaker, Ethnicity without Groups (Harvard University Press, 2004), ch. 8: “1848 in 1998: The Politics of Commemoration in Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia”, pp. 161 – 204

*** Second Research Paper Due ***

*** Final Exam Assignment Given for Take Home ***

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