Mike Rossi

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Content: Courses Designed and Taught

General Course Information

For over ten years I have designed and taught a series of undergraduate courses, both introductory and advanced level, in Political Science at a number of universities. While each course follows a standard template of pedagogy and research regardless of where it is taught, classes are occasionally modified to accommodate departmental needs and class size, which can range from under thirty to over one hundred.

Each syllabus presented has references to dates and locations removed. Additionally, I have divided the courses into two generally accepted subfields of Political Science: Comparative Politics and International Relations. Student evaluation scores and comments for each class are also provided. If the course was taught more than once at the same location, comparative data is included.

Courses Taught

Common Requirements for all Courses

News and current events

I frequently use events and information from current news sources for my classes and encourage my students to regularly read a newspaper with good international and economic coverage. For some classes where current events have a direct impact on what is being taught, such as the introductory courses, newspaper articles are either required reading, or form the basis of class discussion.

Students are also expected to regularly read addtionally the news. regarding up to date information on the subject of the course, and will serve to provide current examples and debates to formal lectures and discussions.

Here are a few available online newspaper sites with good "overall" coverage of a region.  Most can be subscribed via a news feeds.

Region Mainstream MediaAlternative Media
North America
Europe

 

Middle East
South America
Attendance

Attendance is mandatory and will be taken at the beginning of each class. The student is responsible for obtaining any and all work missed. Two or more unexcused absences may affect your overall course grade. Four or more unexcused absences may result in you failing the class. Any absence due to illness or previous engagement must be accompanied by a doctor’s note or other official letter explaining the reason for not being in class. Excused absences will be given in the event of holidays of religious observance, serious conditions that require medical care, required attendance in court or other government bodies, and participation in intercollegiate athletic events. Students taking part in the latter should notify me with documentation before the dates they will not be in class. Four or more unexcused absences may risk you failing the course.

Attendance is mandatory. Lectures will punctuate what you read, but will often include information outside your reading assignments. Four or more unexcused absences may risk you failing the class. You are responsible for any and all work missed.

It should go without saying that attendance is mandatory. Lectures will punctuate what you read, but will often include information outside your reading assignments. Multiple absences will certainly affect your overall grade. Excessive absences may risk you failing the class. You are responsible for any and all work missed.

Because participation is an integral part of your grade, class attendance is required, with three or more unexcused absences negatively affecting your final grade.

Attendance is mandatory and will be taken at the beginning of each class. The student is responsible for obtaining any and all work missed. Excused absences will be given in the event of holidays of religious observance, serious conditions that require medical care, required attendance in court or other government bodies, and participation in intercollegiate athletic events. Students taking part in the latter should notify me with documentation before the dates they will not be in class. Two or more unexcused absences will result in 5 points being deducted from the student’s overall participation grade for each additional class missed without the possibility of making up the difference.

Academic Integrity

Academic integrity encompasses standards of honesty and truth. For the student this largely entails ensuring all work presented is their own with full credit being given to all sources and materials used and consulted in their projects. With the pervasiveness of the Internet and the ability of students to obtain material from an array of digitized sources, prevention of plagiarism is more important than ever. Cases of plagiarism are in clear violation of academic integrity and will be dealt with in accordance to the severity of the case.

This course follows the requirements and penalties of the Academic Integrity Policy found in the Undergraduate Bulletin.  Any suspected violations will be referred to the appropriate Academic Integrity Officer.  If you have questions about academic honesty, please ask.

Students with Disabilities

This courses meet standard University policies and provisions with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Policy. Students with documented disabilities with the University and are in need of certain academic accommodations should notify me as soon as possible with an official note from the Rutgers Office of Disability Services. All information will be kept strictly confidential.

Students with disabilities are encouraged early in the course to discuss with the professor any needed accommodations approved by the Office for Differing Abilities Services and codified in the College’s Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

This course meets standard University policies and provisions with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Policy. Students with documented disabilities with the University and are in need of certain academic accommodations should notify me as soon as possible. Information on disability support can be found at: http://disabilityservices.rutgers.edu/

Recorded Courses

A significant portion of a class will be digitally video recorded for future use in multimedia learning. As such, there is a possibility that students will appear on camera and their comments will be recorded. University policy requires me to inform students the class will be recorded as well as indicate which rows and seats will be within the “camera range”, giving you the chance to sit elsewhere if you do not wish to be on camera. Videos of lectures with presentations will eventually be posted online but not via our Sakai site and will have no connection to the current class, nor function as a component to any grade requirement. A release form is attached at the end of the syllabus for student review, signature, and submission to me as soon as possible.

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©Michael Rossi – http://michael-rossi.demokratio.info