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Content: Democracy and Nation-Building in the Balkans: Syllabus

Parts

It is important to note that this course is multidisciplinary. While the primary starting point for examining the Balkans will be rooted in theories of democratic transitions, there will be a heavy emphasis based on historical texts, anthropological studies, and the multifaceted and diverse forms of expression such as literature, poetry, art, and music. For, it is only when the nature of each ethnic community is examined from many angles that one can come to a comprehensive understanding of the society

WARNING: Although there are no official prerequisites for this course, this is not a course for the noncommittal or the lazy. The material is thorough, the workload is heavy, and I expect a lot. Moreover, the reading is substantial, and many terms and concepts will be exposed to you for the first time. Class lectures are not solely based on assigned readings but will build on what we have read with new information provided by me. Needless to say, class attendance is not only recommended, it is imperative.


Grading Weights

Students have two options of achieving a final grade evaluation in this class:

Work Result Weight Due
Option I
One take home midterm 25% Session 7 (Given session 6)
One take home final 25% Session 15 (Given session 14 - can submit earlier)
One 15 – 20 page paper 25% Session 14
Class and website participation 25% All sessions
Option II (for more advanced students)
One 25 – 30 page paper involving outside research and independent arguments 75%
Topic outline and annotated bibliography Session 7 at latest
First draft Session 12
Final
Session 14
Class and website participation 25% All sessions
Due Dates

(text)

Midterm

(text)

Final

(text)

Paper

(text)

Research Paper

(text)

Participation

(text)


Provided Work Material

The following can be purchased from any online book site:

This book will provide you with the basic history information on the region. You will notice in the reading schedule that each section has a separate ”General History” section for you to read throughout our coverage of a particular section.  This is to help you get a basic understanding of key events, issues, and individuals.

All other required readings will be posted on our class website. Please see below for access information.

Schedule
SessionContent
Introduction

Session 1

Overview of Balkan Politics and Societies

  • Read the syllabus, familiarize yourself with the website, and begin your readings
Part I: The Balkans Under Ottoman Rule (1371 – 1804)
Session 2
  • Traian Stoianovich, “The Conquering Balkan Orthodox Merchant”, Journal of Economic History, vol. 20, no. 2 (June 1960), pp. 234 – 313

Recommended

  • Barbara Jelavich, History of the Balkans, vol. 1, chapter. 1: “Balkan Christians under Ottoman Rule”, (Cambridge University Press, 1983) pp. 39 – 62; 72 – 98; 113 – 126

***It is strongly recommended that you begin the readings for Section II this week too. While each individual reading assignment is not long, nor difficult to comprehend, there are a lot of them.

Part II: Balkan National Reawakenings and Great Power Interests (1690 – 1918)

General History (to be read throughout section)

  • Misha Glenny, The Balkans: Nationalism, War, and the Great Powers, 1804 – 1999.
    • Chapter 1, pp. 1 – 57
    • Chapter 2, pp. 120 – 127
    • Chapter 3, pp. 163 – 168; 192 – 200; 216 – 248
    • Chapter 4, pp. 298 – 306
    • Chapter 5, pp. 323 – 331; 378 – 392
  • John Koliopoulos and Thanos Veremis, Greece: The Modern Sequel, From 1831 to the Present. (New York University Press, 2002) chapter 1, “A Regime to Suit the Nation”, pp. 11 – 43
  • Michael Marrus, The Unwanted: European Refugees from the First World War Through the Cold War, (Temple University Press, 2002), chapter. 1, pp. 40 – 50
Week 3

Theories of Nationalism and State Formation

  • Anthony Smith, National Identity, (University of Nevada Press, 1991)
    • Ch. 2, “The Ethnic Basis of National Identity”, pp. 19 – 42
    • Ch. 4, “Nationalism and Cultural Identity”, pp. 71 – 98
  • Ernest Gellner, Nations and Nationalism, (Cornell University Press, 1983)
    • Ch. 5, “What is a Nation?” pp. 53 – 62
  • Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities, (New York: Verso Press, 1983),
    • Ch. 5, “Old Languages, New Models”, pp. 67 – 82
Week 4

Reconstruction of Identities: Adamantios Korais and Vuk Karadžic

  • John Koliopoulos and Thanos Veremis, Greece: The Modern Sequel, From 1831 to the Present. (New York University Press, 2002)
    • Chapter 12, “Shaping a Nation”, pp. 227 – 241
    • Chapter 13, “Demarcating the Past”, pp. 236 – 241
    • Chapter 14, “The Return of the Hellenes”, pp. 242 - 248
  • Stephen Chaconas, Adamantios Korais: A Study in Greek Nationalism, (Columbia University Press, 1942) chapter 2, “Language and National Regeneration”, pp. 45 – 83
  • Duncan Wilson, The Life and Times of Vuk Stefanovic Karadžic: Literacy, Literature, and National Independence in Serbia, (University of Michigan, 1986)
    • Chapter 4, “Karlovci and Belgrade”, pp. 45 - 62
    • Chapter 5, “Buda, 1810: Serbia 1810 – 1813” pp. 63 – 78
  • Alexis Politis, “From Christian Roman Emperors to the Glorious Greek Ancestors”, Byzantium and the Modern Greek Identity, ed. David Ricks and Paul Magdalino. (Aldershot, England: Ashgate Publishing, 1998), pp. 1 – 14
  • Paschalis Kitromilides, “On the Intellectual Content of Greek Nationalism: Paparrigopoulos, Byzantium and the Great Idea”, in Ricks and Magdalino, pp.    25 – 33

Recommended

  • Raphael Demos, “The Neo-Hellenic Enlightenment (1750 – 1821)”, Journal of the History of Ideas, vol. 19, no. 4 (October 1958), pp. 523 – 541
  • George Huxley, “Aspects of Modern Greek Historiography of Byzantium”, in Ricks and Magdalino, pp. 15 – 23
Week 5

Greek and Serbian Historical Memory

  • Anastasia Karakasidou, Fields of Wheat, Hills of Blood: Passages of Nationhood in Greek Macedonia, 1870 – 1990 (Chicago University Press, 1997), ch. 3, pp. 77 – 107
  • Paul Stephenson, The Legend of Basil the Bulgar-Slayer (Cambridge University Press, 2003), chapter 8, “Basil and the ‘Macedonian Question’”, pp. 113 – 134
  • Michael Herzfeld, Ours Once More: Folklore, Ideology, and the Making of Modern Greece, (New York: Pella Publishing Company, 1986)
  • Chapter 1 “Past Glories, Present Politics”, pp. 3 – 23

  • Chapter 6 “Expansion and Collapse”, pp. 123 – 139

  • Vuk Karadžic, Songs of the Serbian People, translated and edited by Milne Holton and Vasa D. Mihailovich. (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1997), chapter 3, “The Battle of Kosovo”, pp. 131 – 158

  • Petar Njegoš, The Mountain Wreath, translated by Vasa D. Mihailovich. Irvine, (California: Charles Schlacks, Jr. Publishers 1986)
  • Nicholas Pappas, “Between Two Empires: Serbian Survival in the Years after Kosovo”, in Serbia’s Historical Heritage, ed. Alex N. Dragnich. (New York: Columbia University Press 1994), pp. 17 – 37

  • Alexander Greenawalt, “Kosovo Myths: Karadžic, Njegoš, and the Transformation of Serb Memory”, Spaces of Identity, vol. 3 (2001), pp. 49 – 65

Recommended

  • Donald M. Nicol, The Immortal Emperor: The Life and Legend of Constantine Palaiologos, Last Emperor of the Romans (Cambridge University Press, 2002)
  • Victor Roudometof, Nationalism, Globalization and Orthodoxy: The Social Origins of Ethnic Conflict in the Balkans (Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 2001), chapter 4, “Invented Traditions, Symbolic Boundaries, and National Identity in Greece and Serbia, 1830 – 1880”, pp. 101 – 130

*** Take Home Midterm given***

 

Part IV: Democracy and Dictatorships: The Balkans, 1918 – 1945

General History

  • Misha Glenny, The Balkans

    • Chapter 6, pp. 393 – 396; 402 – 412; 423 – 436; 460 – 477

    • Chapter 7, pp. 485 – 506;

  • Michael Marrus, The Unwanted, ch. 2, pp. 96 – 109
Week 6

Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy

  • Barrington Moore, Jr.: Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy, (Boston: Beacon Press, 1966), pp. chapter 7, “The Democratic Route to Modern Society”, pp. 413 – 432

*** Take Home Midterm due ***

Weeks 6 - 7

Rise of Anti-Democratic Elements

  • L. S. Stavrianos, The Balkans Since 1453 (New York University Press, 2000),
    • Ch. 31, “The Dynamics of Balkan Politics” 1918 – 1939”, pp. 593 – 615
    • Ch. 32, “Yugoslavia: 1918 – 1939”, pp. 616 – 643
    • Ch. 34, “Greece: 1918 – 1939”, pp. 661 – 687

Recommended

  • John Lampe, Yugoslavia as History (Cambridge University Press, 2000)

    • Chapter 5 “Parliamentary kingdom, 1921 – 1928”, pp. 129 – 162

    • Chapter 6, “Authoritarian kingdom, 1929 – 1941”, pp. 163  – 200

  • Andrew Baruch Wachtel, Making a Nation, Breaking a Nation: Literature and Cultural Politics in Yugoslavia (Sanford University Press, 1998), chapter 2, pp. 67 – 127
Part V: The Balkans in the Cold War (1945 – 1990)

General History

  • Misha Glenny, chapter 8, pp. 570 – 595; 608 – 622; 622 – 633

Week 8

The Greek Civil War

  • Misha Glenny, The Balkans, ch.7, pp. 536 – 544
  • John Iatrides, Studies in the History of the Greek Civil War, 1945 – 1949, (Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press, 1987) pp. 195 – 219
Week 8

Greek and Turkish Conflicts in the Mediterranean

  • Phaedon John Kozyris, “The Legal Dimension of the Current Greek-Turkish Conflict: A Greek Viewpoint”, in Keridis and Triantaphyllou, pp. 102 – 114
  • Robert McDonald, “Greek-Turkish Relations and the Cyprus Conflict” Greek-Turkish Relations in an Era of Globalization, ed. Dimitris Keridis and Dimitrios Triantaphyllou (Dulles, Virginia: Brassey’s, Inc, 2001), pp. 116 – 150

Recommended

  • Yorgos A. Kourvetaris, “The Southern Flank of NATO: Political Dimensions of the Greco-Turkish conflict since 1974”, East European Quarterly, vol. XXI, no. 4 (January 1988), pp. 431 – 448
  • Thanos Veremis, “The Protracted Conflict”, Greek-Turkish Relations in an Era of Globalization, in Keridis and Triantaphyllou, pp. 42 – 55
Week 9

Tito’s Yugoslavia

  • V.P. Gagnon, The Myth of Ethnic War: Serbia and Croatia in the 1990s, (Cornell University Press, 2004), chapter 3 “Political Conflict in the League of Communists of Yugoslavia, 1960s – 1990s”, pp. 52 – 86

Recommended

  • John Lampe, Yugoslavia as History (Cambridge University Press, 2000)
    • Chapter 9, “Tito’s Yugoslavia Ascending, 1954 – 1967”, pp. 265 – 298
    • Chapter 10, “Tito’s Yugoslavia Descending, 1968 – 1988”, pp. 299-331
  • Andrew Wachtel, Making a Nation, Breaking a Nation, chapter 3, pp. 128 – 172
Part V: National Interests via the West, or vs. the West? (1990 – present)
Weeks 10 - 11

Theories of Democratic Transitions in the Balkans

  • Juan Linz and Alfred Stepan, Problems of Democratic Transition and Consolidation, (Johns Hopkins U. Press, 1996), chapters 1 – 4, pp. 3 – 65
  • P. Nikiforos Diamandouros, and F. Stephen Larrabee, “Democratization in South-Eastern Europe: Theoretical Considerations and Evolving Trends”, Experimenting with Democracy: Regime Change in the Balkans, Geoffrey Pridham and Tom Gallagher, eds. (New York: Routledge, 2000), pp. 24 – 64
  • P.H. Liotta, Dismembering the State: The Death of Yugoslavia and Why it Matters (Lanham, Maryland: Lexington Books, 2001), “Balkan Fragmentation and the Rise of the Parastate”, pp. 187 – 215

Week 12

Democracy and Nationalism in Serbia and Croatia (1990–2000)

  • Stuart J. Kaufman, Modern Hatreds: The Symbolic Politics of Ethnic War, (Cornell University Press, 2001)
    • Chapter 1 “Stories about Ethnic War”, pp. 1 – 13
    • Chapter 6 “Government Jingoism and the Fall of Yugoslavia”, pp. 165 – 201
  • Matthew Collin, Guerrilla Radio: Rock ‘N’ Roll Radio and Serbia’s Underground Resistance (New York: Thunder Mountain Press, 2001)
    • Chapter 1 “Introduction”, pp. 1 – 34
    • Chapter 3 “It’s almost Midnight: 1993 – 1995”, pp. 65 – 98
    • Chapter 4 “Forward! Forward! 1996 – 1997”, 98 – 131
Weeks 13 - 14

The Future of Kosovo and Turkey’s EU Prospects

  • International Crisis Group, Kosovo: The Challenge of Transition, Europe Report N°170 – February 17, 2006, pp. 1 – 31
  • Ziya Önis, “The Role of the European Union in Greek-Turkish Relations: Perpetuator of Conflict or Contributor to Peace?” Greece and Turkey in the 21st Century: Conflict or Cooperation – A Political Economy Perspective, Christos Kollias and Gülay Günlük-Senesen, eds. (New York: Nova Science Publishers, 2003), pp. 165 – 178

Recommended

  • Tom Gallagher, “Nationalism and Democracy in South-East Europe”, in Pridham and Gallagher, pp. 84 – 111
  • John Koliopoulos and Thanos Veremis, Greece: The Modern Sequel, ch. 18, pp. 307 – 326
  • Xavier Bougarel, “Yugoslav Wars: The ‘Revenge of the Countryside’: Between Sociological Reality and Nationalist Myth”, East European Quarterly, vol. 33, no. 2 (June 1999), pp. 157 – 175
  • Robert Thomas, The Politics of Serbia in the 1990s, (Columbia University Press, 1999)
  • V.P. Gagnon, The Myth of Ethnic War (highly recommended)
    • Chapter 2, pp. 31 – 51; Chapter 4, pp. 87 – 130
  • Taner Akçam, “The Genocide of the Armenians and the Silence of the Turks”, Studies in Comparative Genocide, Levon Chorbajian and George Shirinian, eds. (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1999), pp. 125 – 146
  • Faruk Sönmezoglu and Gülden Ayman, “The Roots of Conflict and the Dynamics of Change in Turkish-Greek Relations”, in Kollias and Günlük-Senesen, pp. 37 – 48
  • Orhan Pamuk, Istanbul: Memories and the City (Vintage International, 2006)

*** Research Papers due Week 14 ***

*** Take Home Final Exam given Week 14. Finals due on scheduled date***

While the final exam is due XX, you are encouraged to submit it earlier if you like. The sooner I get everyone’s paper, the sooner I can submit grades.

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